Author Topic: TW Suspension Tech  (Read 7531 times)

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Offline Teut

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TW Suspension Tech

« on: September 11, 2013, 09:52:18 PM »
TW Suspension Tech is solely run by Teut Wiehn who has over 18 years experience of working on motorcycles of all makes and models.  Starting his motorcycle career as a motorcycle mechanic and progressing to workshop manager he then joined Revolution Racing where he developed his skills further as a race engine builder and suspension tuner working at both Club and British Superbike Championship level.
 
Further developing his skills as a suspension tuner and set up specialist he went on to successfully complete numerous training courses that included his advanced suspension technicians course with Race Tech in California and the Tony Foale Motorcycle Dynamics and Suspension Seminar.
 
As a fully qualified and approved installer of Race Tech, Bitubo, Andreani and K-Tech specialist suspension components he has over 11 years experience specialising in suspension set up and tuning.
 
Experience Includes:
Over five years working with riders at British Superbike Level and Club level, working with riders that included:
Paul Emery (2004 Derby Pheonix 750-1300cc Championship Winner), Jon Kirkham (Privateer BSB Superbike Rider For Rizzla Suzuki in 2003) David Jonson (BSB Superstock Championship 2005, 2006) John Ingram ( 2005, 2006 BSB Superstock championship) Craig Fitzpartick (BSB Superstock Championship 2006) and Rob Bugden (Now Austrailian Superbike Champion Rider)
 
These are a just a select few of the riders he has worked with over the years at Club and BSB level.
 
TW Suspension Tech take pride in the work we do, we provide honest advice and support to anyone seeking to improve the handling and performance of their bikes, whether you ride on the road, race track or motocross.
 
We welcome any enquiries and we will be pleased to help you resolve any issues you may have with your bikes handling.
 
"After all, the best you have ridden is the best you know"



Kind Regards

Happy biking all.

Teut

Tel: 07743735346

« Last Edit: February 02, 2016, 05:02:59 PM by Teut »


Offline Adrian6171

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Re: TW Suspension Tech

« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2013, 08:06:23 PM »
Hi Teut,can you please tell me if it is possible to overhaul a 02 fzs600 shocker and if so do you have a price to do this.
Regards Adrian

Offline Teut

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Re: TW Suspension Tech

« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2013, 09:16:55 PM »
Hi Adrian,

Unfortunately the 2002 FZS 600 Shock is non serviceable. However it is possible to have the spring re-powder coated, that would cost around 35. If your shock is leaking oil then I afraid your best option is to get a S/H replacement or upgrade to a Nitron Shock that I order and have built bespoke to suit your weight. Basic performance shock would cost around 390.00

I hope this information is helpful.

For serviceable shocks a re-build with new seals and Re-gas is usually around 100.00

Kind Regards

Teut

TW Suspension Tech


Offline Adrian6171

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Re: TW Suspension Tech

« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2013, 09:28:18 PM »
Hi Teut,been told the shocker is sagging,if that is the word to use,so would a stiffer spring solve the problem.There are no leaks at all.
Regards Adrian

Offline Teut

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Re: TW Suspension Tech

« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2013, 10:51:30 PM »
Hi Adrian,

Would you be able to call past on the weekend, it may just require the pre-load adjusting in that case. It will also allow me to see if the shock and decide if there is something else we can do.

I would be available on Saturday or Sunday Morning.

Kind Regards,

Teut

Offline Adrian6171

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Re: TW Suspension Tech

« Reply #5 on: October 16, 2013, 05:49:15 AM »
Hi not sure yet Teut will hopefully know in a couple of day,s what ere in doors has planned will let you know a s a p.
Regards Adrian

Offline Ducati Joe

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Re: TW Suspension Tech

« Reply #6 on: February 27, 2014, 04:59:31 PM »
I have a question
Would you be able to supply me with a 100nm rear spring for my 2014 Ducati Multistrada 1200 S GT
At the moment I think its an 85nm but with me and the wife on with luggage it squats at the back end, even with the pre load set to firm
The unit is a Sachs progressive damping through monoshock featuring compression, rebound damping and spring preload adjustment.
 
 
Shock absorber
   
Stroke
   
59.5 mm
 
   
Wheel travel
   
170 mm 

Not sure if that helps much. I'm told Ohlins springs will fit, but I'm not sure if that's because they used to have ohlins on the older models.
See here http://www.motorcycleinfo.co.uk/index.cfm?fa=contentGeneric.psqlmptrfsppjcbe&pageId=1236876


Thanks
Joe

Offline Teut

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Re: TW Suspension Tech

« Reply #7 on: February 27, 2014, 08:33:32 PM »
Hi Joe,

No problems, Let me get back to you with a price tomorrow when I have had a chance to check with my supplier.
As you are a member I will supply you the spring at cost and if you bring me the shock I can fit the spring for you, better still if you book the bike in with me when I have the spring I can remove the shock, fit the spring, refit the shock and set the suspension up properly for you if you wish?

Just let me know what suits you best.

Kind Regards,

Teut

Offline Ducati Joe

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Re: TW Suspension Tech

« Reply #8 on: February 27, 2014, 09:10:46 PM »
Thanks Teut
But if you can supply me the spring the dealer I just bought the bike off said they will fit it, that way it shouldn't invalidate the warranty.
But I'm not out for a free ride please ad your cut to the price, I always pay my way, thanks though.

I don't think it need setting up parse, once I get the pre-load how I like it the skyhook computer is supposed to sort every thing else out.
Today I had to select the 2 riders with luggage and go in to the suspension over ride and set the preload to very firm.
We aren't a particularly dainty couple and we had no panniers on today either, there going to ad another 40kg over the back axel once there on, so I don't want to take any chances.
I don't want to ride around Europe with it working over time just fro the sake of a few quid for a stronger spring.

Thanks again for any help, I look forward to hearing from you.

Offline Teut

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Re: TW Suspension Tech

« Reply #9 on: February 27, 2014, 11:00:23 PM »
Hi Joe,

No Problems, I will help you find a spring and get back to you tomorrow.

You said that you were looking for a 100 N spring?  Can you confirm your weight? / average weight the bike is likely to carry as I have made a few calculations and based on the leverage ratio curve of the swing arm to the shock, if your weight was 100 kg you would be better suited to a 117 N spring. If the mass being supported was closer to 120 kg then a 127 N spring would be better suited?

If you can get back to me with some information relating to the likely weight we can calculate a spring rate that will suit you best.

The right spring rate will help in supporting the back end of your bike and also improve your cornering. If the rear spring is too soft for the mass being supported you will probably suffer from under steer in corners with the bike wanting to run wide, especially under acceleration as the weight transfers to the rear of the bike causing it to squat further. 
This squatting effect can also be controlled to some extent by increasing the rear compression damping when you carry extra weight. 
Adding preload to compensate for too low a spring rate will give some improvement but it is limited.
As the spring rate tends to be linear, which means if it was a 100N spring, for every 100 N load on the spring the spring will compress by 1 mm.  Adding more preload will increase the initial load required to compress it, so if 10mm preload was added you will require 1000N of force to act on the spring before it will compress further. However the rate still remains linear which means you still only need to add a further 100 N to compress it by a further mm.  Therefore if you have added full preload and went 2 up with luggage I am sure the shock spring will still compress meaning that you have already passed the 1000N force required to compress the springs initial movement which still wont give you the support needed for ultimate handling.

When you select the correct spring to support the mass of the rider, luggage and pillion then the preload is used to adjust the geometry of the bike. Adding preload to the rear spring will raise the back end of the bike reducing preload will allow the back end to drop. This also applied for the forks. 

To get the ultimate handling select the ideal spring rate to support the mass of the bike and rider, luggage etc. Use the preload to adjust the bikes geometry so it turns into corners, holds its lines and absorbs the impacts without causing the bikes C of G to move excessively. The compression is adjusted to taste and preference, if it feels harsh back off the compression, if the rear squats too much under hard acceleration causing wallowing increase the compression.  If the front end is too harsh back off the compression and if it dives too quickly under braking then increase the compression until you get it just how you would like it.

Rebound is also very critical and should be set to fastest possible return but under control.  It should not feel like a pogo stick but likewise it should not take a second or two to return to its resting position.

I hope that this is helpful in helping you understand a little about how suspension plays an important role and it is a common misconception that you add more preload to compensate for increased mass. It does play a small part but it should not be used as a substitute for having the right spring rate.




Kind Regards,

Teut Wiehn

TW Suspension Tech
www.twsuspensiontech.co.uk
Tel 07743735346

Offline Ducati Joe

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Re: TW Suspension Tech

« Reply #10 on: February 27, 2014, 11:19:13 PM »
hehe I do understand what your saying about preload and dampening but heres my problem

Taken from http://www.ashonbikes.com/content/ducati-multistrada-2013-skyhook-technical

The new suspension is motorcycling's first semi-active system, along with the BMW HP4's. It works by continuously altering the damping front and rear according to a wide range of parameters, but the most important is its response to the speed of movement of the suspension. This is measured by two sensors at each end of the bike. One is positioned on the unsprung mass so it moves up and down with the wheel. The other is above it, attached to the sprung mass - the main body of the bike. The constantly changing distance between these is integrated mathematically to determine the speed, and using this, the Skyhook ECU adjusts the damping to predetermined settings.



Because the damping is entirely electronically controlled it's possible to have a much wider range of damping settings than with a conventional system, or indeed Ducati's previous passive electronically adjustable system, DES. The graph shows just how wide the spread of available damping is, allowing the bike to cope much better with suspension extremes. Yet the system works extremely fast, capable of switching from maximum to minimum damping in just 10 milliseconds. This means if you're riding gently on a smooth road in a soft setting such as Urban and the fork damping is close to its minimum, then you find you're having to slam on the brakes to avoid a dog running out, the front damping will have switched to maximum compression damping well before the forks have reached the end of their travel.

The damping valves themselves are nothing like the conventional stacks of shims or tapered screws in conical holes you have in standard suspension. Instead, they're more like a slightly loose fitting piston in a cylinder bore which the oil flows around. The piston is part of the electric solenoid so its position can be changed very quickly by an altered electrical signal, altering the speed with which the oil can flow past it.



In the spring mass diagrams, k represents the suspension spring, while k-t is the inherent spring effect of the tyre, m is the mass of the wheel assembly and M the mass of the bike supported by the front suspension system (approximately half the mass of the bike, less the combined front and rear unsprung masses).

The spring k is controlled and kept in check by the damping unit c, and it's this which is continuously varied in Skyhook, but fixed in passive systems.

The Comfort Index graphs, which measure the shocks coming through to the sprung mass of the bike, show how Skyhook system matches or slightly beats the best passive setting on various road surfaces, even though on some the hard setting is the best while on others the soft setting is the optimum.

This is why it's not immediately obvious in terms of feel that Skyhook is any better than a conventional system. You need to try the bike in a wide range of conditions and discover how it always feels as if it's set up for them.

There are other parameters taken into account as well as the suspension movement speed, including the throttle position and speed of operation, the brake line pressures and whether or not the ABS has been activated, road speed and acceleration, so the suspension will adjust automatically when you're accelerating and according to how hard, as you apply the brakes and so on.



In the different riding modes the Skyhook system still has access to and makes use of the full range of damping settings, but switching from one mode to another changes its zero point. In Sport for example its zeroed towards firmer damping settings and it always returns to those in normal riding, while in Urban or Enduro it sits at the other end of the scale, providing a softer ride in normal conditions.



What the rider sees in the dash is shown in the Instrumentation image. The menu is navigated in the same way as before via the indicator cancel and two additional sliding buttons on the left switchgear. There's an increase in the information displayed in each mode, with horsepower, throttle response, DTC and ABS information, and for personalising the suspension the display is different. Where the old showed the separate compression and rebound settings as 'click' numbers, on the 2013 S models, you can increase or decrease the damping harder or softer by two stages from the central medium default. This can be done in each of the four modes, so for example if Touring is too firm, you can change it to one or two softer settings, and it will stay there unless you change it back.

I will pm you our weights my life wont be worth living if the wife finds out.

Offline aeaton

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Suspension set up for Yamaha XJ6

« Reply #11 on: December 28, 2014, 06:00:58 PM »
Hi Teut,

I have a Yamaha XJ6 Diversion 2009 with standard factory suspension. With this set up would you still be able to make any adjustments to it for me as a rider or is there nothing that can be done to the standard suspension? I realise the rear shock can be adjusted with preload which I have played with myself but if I paid you a visit can you set the bike up any other way?

Thanks
Andy

Offline Teut

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Re: TW Suspension Tech

« Reply #12 on: January 04, 2015, 07:56:20 PM »
Hi Andy,

Apologies for the delay, I have to admit that its been a while since I have logged on to Lancs Biker,  We have been flat out with suspension tuning and servicing all the way up to christmas and I workshop is filling up again with numerpus race teams and riders looking to have their suspension units serviced prior to testing in Spain in Feb.

Regarding your XJ6 I will be more than happy to help you.  I don't think your forks have any external adjustment and the rear shock is limited to pre-load and possibly rebound, but off memory I can't be sure.  Please feel free to book your bike in with me for a Saturday or Sunday morning and I will measure the geometry of the bike on its stock suspension.  I will establish the best settings possible on what you have and will be able to recommend improvements that I can make internally should you wish to.  From memory the diversions a very soft and low on rebound damping making them a little wallowy.  We can certainly improve all aspects of the suspension internally to improve compression damping, rebound and sags helping to make the bike feel secure and planted on the road. 

As mentioned give me a call on 07743735346 and come over for an initial inspection and discuss what will suit you best. 

Kind Regards,

Teut

Offline firestorm916

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Re: TW Suspension Tech

« Reply #13 on: January 30, 2016, 02:05:48 PM »
Hi Teut,

I need help with my '99RX FireBlade. The rear shock is due a refresh, what can you do?

If it is re-buildable, I can get it to you whenever you can fit me in.

Thanks
Rsx100 Cb350s klr250 diversion600 vfr750fm fzr400rr Tzr2503xv Fireblade900 gsxr400r tdr250 gsxr600srads tl1000s xr600 tzr250sp3xv gsx400s Sherpa250 CBR400 Tri Arm 916Bi gsxr6K1 fzr400 rgv250s FJ1200 Sherpa250 Firestorms Aerox50 z750s Aerox100 Gsxr1000k3 Cbr600 SP2 Trx Tdm Zx6r R1 Versys Cygnus x3 918 Blade J300 ZZR600!

Offline Teut

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Re: Shock Refurbishment - TW Suspension Tech

« Reply #14 on: February 02, 2016, 04:46:12 PM »
Hi, Yeah we can do a full restoration for you which involves complete strip down, spring powder coating, parts vapour blasting and re-zinc plating and rebuild for 220.00

A standard shock strip down and rebuild is 130.00 includes internal seals and bushes and new gassing valve.

New bump stops if required are 15.00

If the piston rod is pitted and corroded then we need to send these for re-chroming which can take approx 3 weeks in itself to get back and costs 100.00 to do.

See attached images of a similar shock completed from start to finish.  More images can be found on our website.

Please note that we are extremely busy a the moment with race suspension and existing work so turnaround is likely to be 4 to 5 weeks for refurbishment projects.  We have suspension work from all over the UK, Ireland and Scotland at the moment so please bear with me.  Where possible we do aim to turnaround quicker.

I hope that this is helpful, but please don't hesitate to give me a call.

Kind Regards,

Teut Wiehn
TW Suspension Tech


 

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